Jim Deeming's Guitar Discovery for Kids

Jim Deeming's Guitar Discovery for Kids

So, you got your kid a guitar… now what? If you are a guitar player, maybe you’ve introduced them to it because it’s one of your passions that you think they’ll enjoy. Or maybe they showed so much of an interest in learning how to play like some of their musical heroes that you finally caved and bought them one. Well, just like their heroes did, they’ll need to start from square one with the basics. But kid’s guitar lessons can be expensive, and teaching them yourself can be frustrating if you’re not sure where to begin!

In Jim Deeming’s new JamPlay guitar course, Guitar Discovery for Kids (suggested age: 10-16yrs), your child can start strong by learning the essentials. They’ll begin by learning the best way to tune their guitar. Then, Jim demonstrates how to strum some of the most common, basic chord shapes. Once they’ve got their chords and strumming patterns figured out, Jim challenges your young learner by covering scales, 7th chords, and even full songs.

Try out a lesson from the course!

Here is one of the more advanced kid’s guitar lessons from the course. In this session, Jim helps the student combine their newfound knowledge of chords and strumming to learn the most common song form in blues music: the 12-bar blues. Blues guitarists helped pave the way for most contemporary pop music, so this is one of the best places any beginner can start! Looking for the guitar tab & notation, or more lessons like this? Check out Jim Deeming’s Guitar Discovery for Kids on JamPlay!

For more guitar lessons and an ever-growing library of Song Lessons, check out JamPlay.com! JamPlay has over 450 guitar courses from 120+ instructors, and online guitar lessons tailored to every skill level, music genre, and playing style. Click here to learn more.


Share this

Become a JamPlay member for unlimited access to 7000+ guitar lessons and 120+ artists and instructors. View membership plans ›


Related Posts

Back To Music School

2022 Back to Music School Month

TrueFire Studios' 2022 Back to Music School Sale & Giveaway

AMAZING Giveaway Prizes!

Sharpen Your Skills With the Help of Expert Educators.

August is upon us, and that can only mean one thing… school is back in session! – In collaboration with Sweetwater.com and our TrueFire Studios sister brands (TrueFire, ArtistWorks, and FaderPro), we’re bringing you fresh ways to learn and sharp new giveaway prizes. This month, you can win a D’Angelico Premier Bedford SH Semi-hollow Electric Guitar, an Epiphone Hummingbird Studio Acoustic-Electric Guitar, a Supro Delta King 12 15-watt 1 x 12-inch Tube Combo Amp, and much more!

Share this


Related Posts


How to Play Guitar Like Brian May

How to Play Guitar Like Brian May (Queen)

In 1970, one of the greatest bands of all time was born. The London-originating Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductees, Queen had humble beginnings that made for a slow start in terms of mainstream attention. Things changed for the band in 1974 following the global success of their single, “Killer Queen.” Marked by dark piano riffs, evocative vocals, and a toe-tapping-worthy groove, the song is nothing short of infectious. But for guitar players worldwide, another part of the song shone brightly: Brian May‘s dark, yet angelic guitar solo. Today, we won’t be covering how to play that solo… or any particular solo for that matter. Instead, JamPlay educator, Chris Liepe is going to show us how to achieve Brian May’s playing style and legendary electric guitar tone. Let’s dive in!

Brian May Guitar Lesson:

Brian May‘s musical legacy includes contributing to all of Queen’s studio and live albums, collaborating with some of modern music’s biggest stars, and (to us, most importantly) forging one of the most legendary guitar tones in history. This guitar tone is a product of a couple ingredients. One of them is his custom guitar, the ‘Red Special,’ which he and his father designed and crafted together when Brian was an adolescent. Other factors, of course, include effects pedals, guitar amps, and other sonic-shaping tools.

In this lesson with Chris Liepe, you’ll learn how you can recreate a similar tone using an electric guitar and some amp and pedal modeling software. Don’t be intimidated if you don’t have software like Positive Grid’s Bias FX, though. Since these virtual tools are just emulations of real gear, you can still follow along if you’ve got physical effects effects pedals and an amplifier!

After you’ve dialed in your Brian May guitar tone, Chris teaches you how to play a short lick that mimics Brian’s style. Notice how all of the notes are picked instead of played legato. And don’t forget: no Brian May guitar solo would be complete without some vibrato and a whole step bend!

 

For more Chris Liepe guitar lessons and an ever-growing library of Song Lessons, check out JamPlay.com! JamPlay has over 450 guitar courses from 120+ instructors, and online guitar lessons tailored to every skill level, music genre, and playing style. Click here to learn more.


Share this

Become a JamPlay member for unlimited access to 7000+ guitar lessons and 120+ artists and instructors. View membership plans ›


Related Posts

Trevor Gordon Hall's Fingerstyle Fireworks Guitar Course

Trevor Gordon Hall's Fingerstyle Fireworks Guitar Course

When you start learning fingerstyle guitar, it’s important to begin with the rudiments. Without these, you’re more likely to develop bad technique and struggle more than you need to with some commonly-encountered roadblocks. But, when you’ve got the basics down, then it’s time for the fun stuff.

In Trevor Gordon Hall’s Fingerstyle Fireworks guitar course, you’ll take your first look at some techniques, approaches, and tricks you can employ to add some pizzaz to your playing. Let’s light the fuse and get these fireworks popping!

About the Course:

In contrast to some of Trevor Gordon Hall‘s other, comprehensive JamPlay guitar courses, Fingerstyle Fireworks serves as a “buffet style” introduction to several techniques and tricks. You’ll cover acoustic percussive approaches, guitar harmonics, adding rhythm to your fretting hand, and synchronizing your right and left hands. If you’ve already got a grasp of fingerstyle fundamentals, this course is perfect for you.

Try out a fingerstyle lesson from the course!

In this lesson from Trevor Gordon Hall’s Fingerstyle Fireworks, you’ll be learning how to combine three techniques. First, you’ll be hammering on some partial chords, then pulling them off in a rhythmic, “explosive” way. Finally you’ll incorporate slap harmonics to punctuate each chord. When played all together, it should sound like an acoustic, percussive drum fill. Once you get it down, a trick like this can add that extra sparkle that will keep your audience engaged.

 

For more fingerstyle guitar lessons and an ever-growing library of Song Lessons, check out JamPlay.com! JamPlay has over 450 guitar courses from 120+ instructors, and online guitar lessons tailored to every skill level, music genre, and playing style. Click here to learn more.


Share this

Become a JamPlay member for unlimited access to 7000+ guitar lessons and 120+ artists and instructors. View membership plans ›


Related Posts

4 Famous Guitar Amps You Should Know

4 Famous Guitar Amps You Should Know

4 Famous Guitar Amps You Should Know

In some recent JamPlay blog posts, we’ve talked about different types of guitars you’ll see on the stage, as well as famous guitar pedals that shaped history. But it’s also important to mention that there is a third component to getting the guitar tone you’re looking for: a guitar amplifier. And there are so many different guitar amps to choose from; the customization possibilities are endless. But, only a handful have gained icon status and earned the favor of some of history’s most legendary players. Let’s take a look at four famous guitar amps you should know!

fender twin reverb guitar amp
Paulus 2, CC BY-SA 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons

Fender Twin Reverb Guitar Amp

Fender’s Twin Reverb is probably the most famous guitar amp in terms of achieving a clean tone. Introduced during Fender’s “Blackface era” (during which amps featured black faceplates) in the 1960s, the Twin Reverb is revered for its amazing onboard spring reverb. You’ve probably heard this legendary amps tone if you’ve listened to enough music White Stripes, Stevie Ray Vaughan, or even B.B. King.

Although an original 1965 Fender Twin Reverb would run you about $3000-$5000, you can get your hands on a reissue of this classic for under $1950 on Sweetwater! This reissue is particularly exciting because of Fender’s dedication to recreating the mid-’60s technical setup that players originally fell in love with.

 

Marshall Plexi Guitar Amp
By http://muzyczny.pl – http://muzyczny.pl, CC BY-SA 4.0

Marshall 1959 Super Lead 100 Watt Plexi

Contrary to what its title may suggest, the Marshall 1959 was actually introduced in 1965 and was produced until 1981. This guitar amp’s conception was a result of The Who’s legendary guitarist, Pete Townshend requested that Marshall make a 100 watt amplifier. The 100 watt Plexi edition of the Marshall 1959 is famous for being the quintessential rock guitar amp, and was also used by both Eric Clapton and Jimi Hendrix.

If you are seeking a monstrous amount of volume and the ultimate rock tone, you can find a hand-wired reissue of the Marshall 1959 on Sweetwater.

 

vox ac30 guitar amp
Johnsamps, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Vox AC30 Guitar Amp

According to legend, the 30 watt version of Vox’s AC line resulted from Cliff Richard’s guitarist, Hank Marvin requesting an amp that was loud enough to be heard over the cacophony of screaming showgoers. Vox has released several technically different models of the AC30 since its debut in 1959. Its cabinet design was updated in 1960 to what you see in the image above, and essentially hasn’t changed since. This guitar amp has been favored by guitar legends such as George Harrison, John Lennon, Brian May, and Bill Wyman, and continues to be a popular pick for guitarists.

You can find great deals on various Vox AC30 models on Sweetwater! Newer versions of this amp are technically reissues, but still perform just as well.

 

roland jc-120 guitar amp
Solomon203, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Roland JC-120 Guitar Amp

The Roland Jazz Chorus (JC) series probably contains the most versatile set of amplifiers on this list. The JC-120 got its name because of the chorus effect built into the guitar amp. However, this combination amp is most famous for its clean tones across varying genres. Having been favored by Andy Summers of The Police and Albert King, but also by Metallica guitarists James Hetfield and Kirk Hammett, this champ of an amp is suitable for any style of playing.

You can even find one for under $1250 on Sweetwater. Yes, this is a link to the original – no reissues on this one!

 

Excited to look at some new guitar amps? Find all kinds of great guitar gear deals over at Sweetwater.com.

For guitar lessons that teach you how to use effects like these, check out JamPlay.com! JamPlay has over 450 guitar courses from 120+ instructors, LIVE daily instruction, and online guitar lessons tailored to every skill level, music genre, and playing style. Click here to learn more.


Share this

Become a JamPlay member for unlimited access to 7000+ guitar lessons and 120+ artists and instructors. View membership plans ›


Related Posts


Trevor Gordon Hall's Fingerstyle Fretting Hand Mastery

Fingerstyle, synonymous with fingerpicking, is one of the most popular modern guitar techniques. Although the technique has been around for hundreds of years, the contemporary style was made globally popular by guitar pioneers like Merle Travis and Chet Atkins. And through the generations, the methods for learning and partaking in this tradition have become more and more refined.

In Trevor Gordon Hall’s JamPlay guitar course, Fingerstyle Fretting Hand Mastery, he aims to help you avoid getting stuck on some of the most common roadblocks you’ll encounter learning this style. Believe it or not, your fretting hand can be a stealthy culprit. Let’s dive in to mastering your fingerstyle fretting hand!

About the Course:

In the world of fingerstyle guitar, having flexibility, strength, and an expressive touch in your fretting hand is paramount to performing. So, you’ll start this course by learning best ways to stretch vertically and horizontally to notes. This will be an important skill to hone when you start learning essential chord voicings. Then, Trevor will walk you through some key strength exercises so you can build the stamina you’ll need to carry out full performances, especially on an acoustic guitar. Lastly, Trevor will fill you in on how to play with force while maintaining an expressive touch. Playing expressively is how you keep an audience engaged and emotionally invested in a song.

Try it out!

Here’s an example of an expressive technique you’ll be working on with Trevor Gordon Hall. When playing natural harmonics, it’s important to stay nimble with your fretting hand. Otherwise you’ll end up getting a bad tone, or inadvertently dampening the notes when they should be ringing out.

 

For more fingerstyle guitar lessons and an ever-growing library of Song Lessons, check out JamPlay.com! JamPlay has over 450 guitar courses from 120+ instructors, and online guitar lessons tailored to every skill level, music genre, and playing style. Click here to learn more.


Share this

Become a JamPlay member for unlimited access to 7000+ guitar lessons and 120+ artists and instructors. View membership plans ›


Related Posts

How To Read Guitar Tabs - A Beginner's Guide

How To Read Guitar Tab - A Beginner's Guide

Starting to play guitar is (almost) always a daunting task. It’s very normal to feel discouraged by the difference in skill level between you and some of your favorite players. But there are plenty of tried and true tools that can help you tackle the learning curve. One of the most helpful tools for guitarists is tablature, or ‘tab‘ for short, which is a way of transcribing instrument fingerings instead of musical pitches. And, contrary to popular belief, tabs are not a modern invention to help lazy guitar players. Tablature has been around since the 14th century, was popular during the Baroque and Renaissance periods, and was used to learn many different instruments. So feel no shame when checking out guitar tabs for your favorite songs, regardless of your level of playing!

Today we’ll be showing you how guitar tabs can be interpreted. So, without further ado, let’s learn how to read guitar tabs!

The Basics of Guitar Tab

Before we dive into the symbols that notate different guitar techniques, let’s get the very basics out of the way. As we mentioned, tabs display fingerings on a guitar rather than musical notes. Here’s what to expect when looking at tab:

The Lines

Guitar Tab 1Guitar tab gives us a crude timeline displaying the strings in descending order of pitch. In the tab pictured above, you can see the top line represents the high E string (if in standard tuning), while the bottom line represents the low E string. We should note that many popular songs feature alternate tunings and the use of a capo. This information will usually be provided in the beginning of guitar tab sheets alongside the key and tempo of the song.

The Numbers

Guitar Tab 2The most valuable information we get from guitar tabs is where to place our fingers. Fingerings for guitar parts are notated by numbers, which tell us which fret to hold in order to play the right notes, and in which order. Above is an example of a single-note line that outlines the C major pentatonic scale. The first number that appears is a “3” on the fifth line down. So, to play this note, we would place a finger on third fret of the fifth string. The next number is a “0” on the fourth line from the top. “0” always represents a note that is not fretted, so we would play this by striking the open fourth string. But, what if notes are played at the same time? The image below illustrates how we notate chords, or multiple notes played simultaneously.

Guitar Tab 3Since we read guitar tabs sequentially from left to right, any time you see notes that are directly in line with each other vertically, this means they are played simultaneously. This tab notates an F major barre chord (the chord being played in the image near the top of this blog) followed by a G minor chord.

Other Common Guitar Tab Symbols & Notations

Now that we’ve covered the very basics, it’s time to look at some other symbols you’ll encounter when learning your favorite songs.

Slashes & Sloping Lines

Guitar Tab 4

When learning a lead guitar part or solo, it’s common to come across forward or back slashes. These indicate there is a slide between notes. If you see a smaller number followed by a “/” or upward sloping line, and then a larger number (as seen above), this mean you should slide up from the lower fret to the higher one. You’ll slide down when the first number is larger and there is a “\” or downward sloping line in between.

‘H,’ ‘P,’ & Legato Ties

Guitar Tab 5

In music, the term “legato” refers to notes being strung together without space between them. In other words, legato happens when the end of one note is immediately followed by the start of another. We achieve this on the guitar by using hammer-ons and pull-offs. In guitar tabs, this is notated two different ways. You will either see two notes separated by an “h” (for hammer-on) or a “p” (for pull-off), or you will see a tie between notes regardless if they’re to be a hammered-on or pulled-off. In the image above, notice how two hammer-ons in the same position are notated different ways.

Wavy Lines

Guitar Tab 6

The term “vibrato” refers to the rapid oscillation in pitch when sustaining a note. This is not to be confused with a trill, which is a rapid succession of hammer-ons and pull-offs between two notes. You’ve likely seen vibrato in action if you’ve watched any blues guitar players shake a note during a solo; this is one of the most expressive techniques available to guitar players. We notate vibrato in guitar tabs by displaying a wavy line above the staff and the note that should be played with vibrato. Reading the tab above, only the final C note should be played with vibrato.

Curved Arrows

Guitar Tab 7

Curved Arrows in guitar tab signify a string bend. And, accompanying the arrow is usually the word “Full” or the fraction “1/2.” When the word, “Full” appears, the note is intended to be bent up a whole step, or the equivalent of two frets. This is the case with the image above.

Guitar Tab 8

In this next case, there is a second arrow that points downward. The second arrow lets us know the note should be un-bent to its original position after reaching the desired interval of the bend. These notations are very common if you’re reading guitar tab for blues, country, and rock music.

Although there are other symbols you’ll come across when reading guitar tabs, the ones we’ve listed here are the most common. We hope this helps you get a head start on learning your favorite songs on guitar. Happy playing!

For an ever-growing library of Song Lessons complete with guitar tab, check out JamPlay.com! JamPlay has over 450 guitar courses from 120+ instructors, and online guitar lessons tailored to every skill level, music genre, and playing style. Click here to learn more.


Share this

Become a JamPlay member for unlimited access to 7000+ guitar lessons and 120+ artists and instructors. View membership plans ›


Related Posts

Nathan Whitney Flying Solo Modern Country Guitar Course

Nathan Whitney's Flying Solo: Modern Country Guitar Course

You’ve gotten your country guitar rhythm chops down, and now you’re interested in learning to play lead. But taking a solo at any gig seems daunting at this point. You know some skills and have some favorite guitar players in mind. Where do you begin learning to play like them? The answer is: at the beginning like all of your favorite guitar heroes.

Luckily, you’ve got one of the best country guitar teachers anyone could ask for. In his course, Flying Solo: Modern Country, Nathan Whitney (right-hand guitar player to country music star, Thomas Rhett) shows you how you can take your fundamental knowledge and apply it to learning how to solo for country guitar.

About the Course:

One of the best ways to learn a guitar solo is to break it down step by step. That is exactly how Nathan Whitney guides you in his course, Flying Solo: Modern Country. By practicing individual licks, then connecting them, you’ll play your way through three distinct guitar solos.

Throughout the course, you’ll get a feel for different styles of lead country guitar. Each of the three solos is rooted in Classic Country, Urban Melodies, and Country Fried Rock, respectively. Honing techniques such as double stops, hybrid picking, alternate picking, and string bending will be crucial for learning these rockin’ solos!

 

Try it out!

Here’s an example of one of the solos you’ll be learning with Nathan Whitney. For the full JamPlay course, complete with individual guitar lick breakdowns, guitar tab, notation, & jam tracks, check out Nathan Whintey’s Flying Solo: Modern Country!

 

For an ever-growing library of Song Lessons, check out JamPlay.com! JamPlay has over 450 guitar courses from 120+ instructors, and online guitar lessons tailored to every skill level, music genre, and playing style. Click here to learn more.


Share this

Become a JamPlay member for unlimited access to 7000+ guitar lessons and 120+ artists and instructors. View membership plans ›


Related Posts

What Type of Guitar Strings Should I Use?

What Type of Guitar Strings Should I Use?

What Type of Guitar Strings Should I Use?

What Type of Guitar Strings Should I Use?

Have you ever found yourself in a music store and felt overwhelmed by the sheer number of guitar strings options? You are not alone. There almost seem like too many options. And, to the untrained eye, it might just seem like a lot of brands offering the same product. However, as a guitar player, it’s important for you to know that there are so many options because there are many different types of strings that are all used for different applications. Here, we are going to explore which type of guitar strings is best for YOU and what you are playing.

First, we’ll take a look at what different materials guitar strings can be composed of. Then we’ll touch on how strings are constructed differently. And finally, we’ll tell you why that matters for the type of music you are playing. Let’s get started!

classical guitar stringsDifferent String Materials for Different Guitars

When you look at most guitars, it’s clear to see that most of them are strung with some type of metal. But did you know the type of metal has an effect on the tone and feel of the strings when you play them? And what about those clear, plastic-y looking strings you see on some acoustic guitars? Let’s take a closer look.

Electric Guitars

Electric guitars are almost always strung with one of two types of metal strings: steel or nickel. However, the former is the most common type. Generally, steel strings produce a brighter tone that cuts through the mix in a band setting. Nickel is a softer metal than steel, and you can feel this when you play them. They also produce a warmer, and low-end-present response. This can be less appealing if you are the lead guitar player, but proves very effective if you are playing rhythm parts.

Acoustic Guitars

Two different types of metals are used when stringing acoustic guitars: brass and bronze. Similarly to the tone difference you’ll find between steel and nickel electric guitar strings, brass strings tend to sound brighter, while bronze strings produce warmer tones.

Classical Guitars

Classical guitars, which are suited for playing Classical style guitar arrangements, are typically strung with a combination of materials. The highest three strings are traditionally pure, transparent nylon. The lower three strings are usually nylon wound with copper. If you are looking for classical guitar strings, you can find a generous selection of them over on Sweetwater.

guitar string constructionTypes of Guitar Strings Construction

The tone and feel of guitar strings are also affected by how they are constructed. The construction of guitar strings usually depends on just a few variables.

The Core of The Guitar String

When looking down the middle of a wound guitar string, you’ll observe one of two variations. The core of a guitar string will either be hexagonal or round. Hex core strings will provide a more modern, louder and sharper tone. The tone produced by a round core string is more mellow, which is perfect for playing certain genres.

How The Guitar Strings are Wound

To be clear, when we are talking about how the strings are wound, we are referring to the lowest three or four strings that have noticeable ridges on them. The three main types of string winding are round wound, half round, and flat wound.

Round wound strings are ubiquitous; they can be found on most guitars if you are perusing a music shop. This is because they are the most versatile. In fact, if you are using nickel plated round wound strings, you will likely have a place in any band setting if you’ve got the skills to match. But, generally speaking, round wound guitar strings have the potential to produce higher, brighter frequencies than the other types.

The next strings down on the brightness scale are half round guitar strings. They are called half round strings because the actual cord that is wound around the core has retained most of its roundness, but also features a flat face. These strings will produce a warmer tone, but also achieve some of the brightness you’d want if you were playing lead.

Flat wound strings are the most warm of these options, and have mostly niche applications because of their limited frequency response. Unlike those that are round wound, flat wound guitar strings will appear smooth instead of lined with ridges.

The Gauge of The Strings

Finally, the gauge, or the thickness of the strings plays a huge role in their tone and feel. Thicker gauges are going to produce a warmer sound and sustain better. But, they will also be tougher to press into the fret if you are just starting out, and they bend much less easily. Thinner gauges will sound a slightly more thin, but don’t let that deter you. Some genres call for this type of tone, especially if you need to do a lot of string bending!

electric guitar stringsWhat Type of Guitar Strings Should YOU Use?

This is the reason you opened this article, and we won’t keep you waiting any longer! Let’s take a look at some of the most popular genres for guitar players and see what types of guitar strings are superior first picks!

Metal

If you play guitar in a metal band, you are going to want strings that compliment the heavy levels of distortion through which you’ll be routing your signal. Also, you are going to want to air on the side of ‘heavy’ to accommodate any drastic drop tunings. So, the next time you outfit your axe for metal, try some nickel plated, round wound, hex core steel strings that come with thicker gauges in the lower strings. Our friends over at Sweetwater even have their own favorites in this category!

Rock

Rock guitar can call for a couple different types of strings, depending on how ‘classic’ the rock is! Modern rock styles may require a brighter tone, so you’ll either want to stick to at least nickel plated steel strings with hex cores. We would recommend always going with round wound strings with a medium to light gauge. This will allow you to get the bite you’re looking for when ripping power chords, but the flexibility to bend strings when it’s time to shred. Here are some great options on Sweetwater!

If you find yourself in a more classic rock setting and you’re holding an electric guitar, consider going with a set of pure nickel guitar strings. These will give you some of that extra body and punch that pairs well with a classic fuzz pedal. Try these D’Addario strings out! However, if you’re supporting the lead guitarist with an acoustic, definitely set yourself up with some brass strings. These will be bright enough to add some jangle to the tune without distracting from the vocalist. Here’s a set that we recommend!

Blues

When you’re playing the blues, you’re looking for sweet, warm tones regardless of your place in the band. So, if you’re rocking an electric guitar, get your hands on some round wound or half round, pure nickel strings with a medium to light gauge. You’ll get the warmth you’re looking for, with the bend-ability you’ll need for soloing. Try out these pure nickel strings on Sweetwater!

For playing acoustic blues, you’ll still be chasing that warmer, more resonant tone. So, here’s a set of phosphor bronze strings that should do the trick!

Country

Twang is the thang when you’re holding down the hootenanny with some country guitar playing! If you’re rocking an electric guitar, you’ll want brightness to pair with your single-coil neck pickup. So, we recommend round wound, nickel plated, hex core strings with a light enough gauge to support bending. Take your pick over at Sweetwater!

For acoustic playing, consider something bring like those we recommended for playing classic rock above!

Jazz

If you are playing acoustic or electric jazz guitar, 95% of the time you’ll be holding down the rhythm section with the drummer and upright bassist. And when it’s time to solo, sharp tones should be the last thing you endeavor for. In all cases, you’ll want the warmest, smoothest tones available. So, you’ll want to grab yourself a set of flat wound strings for minimal finger sliding sounds, and buttery warm tones. You may also consider going with a slightly heavier gauge string for better sustain and better low-end response. Thomastik-Infeld makes some decent strings for jazz playing; try these for acoustic playing, and these for electric!

Classical

Lastly, the tone you get out of a classical guitar is paramount to a perfect performance. Many things factor into this, including the resonance of the instrument’s wood and shape, the fingerstyle technique of the performer, and of course the quality of the strings. In modern days, classical guitar strings are always made with nylon (they were, at one time, made from silk wound with catgut). You can find an amazing selection of nylon classical guitar strings over at Sweetwater!

 

Excited to look at some new guitar strings? Find all kinds of great gear deals over at Sweetwater.com.

For guitar lessons that teach you how to use effects like these, check out JamPlay.com! JamPlay has over 450 guitar courses from 120+ instructors, LIVE daily instruction, and online guitar lessons tailored to every skill level, music genre, and playing style. Click here to learn more.


Share this

Become a JamPlay member for unlimited access to 7000+ guitar lessons and 120+ artists and instructors. View membership plans ›


Related Posts


The Star Spangled Banner Guitar Lesson

The Star Spangled Banner Guitar Lesson

One thing you probably didn’t know about the United States’ national anthem is that it was mainly created by two different people. The lyrics that we, in the U.S., learn to recite at a young age were written in 1814 by Francis Scott key, a lawyer from Maryland. The music, however, was originally a tune called “To Anacreon in Heaven” written in 1780 by a composer named John Stafford Smith. The lyrics and music were later combined to form “The Star Spangled Banner,” which was adopted at the U.S. national anthem in 1931.

In almost a century’s time, countless musicians, composers, conductors, and orchestras have recited their own versions of this anthem – some of them being guitar players! In fact, one famous instance of a U.S. National Anthem guitar performance was Jimi Hendrix‘s at the Woodstock Music and Art Festival in 1969. Today, we’re going to show you how you can play “The Star Spangled Banner” on guitar!

Performance & Tips for Expressive Playing

In this lesson, David MacKenzie shows you how to play “The Star Spangled Banner” on guitar. As David explains, you can use techniques such as string bending, vibrato, hammer-ons, pull-offs, and even slides to add expression and musicality to the performance.

 

For an ever-growing library of Song Lessons, check out JamPlay.com! JamPlay has over 450 guitar courses from 120+ instructors, and online guitar lessons tailored to every skill level, music genre, and playing style. Click here to learn more.


Share this

Become a JamPlay member for unlimited access to 7000+ guitar lessons and 120+ artists and instructors. View membership plans ›


Related Posts