Beatles_Songs

3 Beatles Songs to Learn on Guitar (Global Beatles Day)

3 Beatles Songs to Learn on Guitar (Global Beatles Day)

Beatles_Songs

The Beatles, also known as “the fab four,” consisted of Paul McCartney, John Lennon, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr. In the mid-to-late 1960s, they were considered synonymous with pop culture globally. The group released 21 studio albums amongst over 200 other publications, and made copious television and stage appearances before disbanding in 1970. However, this legendary quartet’s influence spans far past its heyday. The Beatles have inspired countless singers, songwriters, producers, drummers, bass player, and guitarists since their stardom, and continue to inspire musicians today.

In 2009, a Beatles fan proposed that June 25th be proclaimed Global Beatles Day to honor the band’s participation in the 1967 BBC special, Our World. The holiday caught on, and that’s why we are celebrating today! JamPlay offers a number of comprehensive Beatles song lessons, but today we’re celebrating by showcasing a few. So, here are 3 Beatles songs to learn on the guitar!

Beatles Song #1 – “A Hard Day’s Night”

Instantly recognizable by the opening chord played on John Lennon’s Rickenbacker 12-String guitar, “A Hard Day’s Night” is a timeless rock ‘n roll hit. This Beatles son topped the charts in both the US and the UK when released as a single.

In this performance, John Auker demonstrates the main guitar parts for “A Hard Day’s Night.” One of the guitars that John uses is the same type of Rickenbacker 12-String guitar that was used on the original recording. For the breakdown of this tune, check out John Auker’s full song lesson on JamPlay.

Beatles Song #2 – “Yesterday”

A fun fact about “Yesterday” is that almost no other song in recording history has been covered as much as this one. This wistful tune was the first Beatles song that featured a solo performance, as only Paul McCartney’s voice, an acoustic guitar, and a string quartet comprise the arrangement.

In this lesson, Marcelo Berestovoy performs a solo guitar version of “Yesterday” before analyzing the song’s chord progression. For the breakdown of this iconic tune, check out Marcelo’s full song lesson on JamPlay.

Beatles Song #3 – “Can’t Buy Me Love”

The UK’s fourth best-selling single of the ’60s, “Can’t Buy Me Love” is truly one of the most infectious Beatles songs. This internationally chart-topping behemoth of a hit is also the 295th mention on Rolling Stone Magazine’s list of the 500 Greatest Songs Of All Time.

In this performance, Dennis Hodges demonstrates how to play the chord progression and guitar parts for “Can’t Buy Me Love.” For the breakdown of this Beatles song, check out Dennis’ full song lesson on JamPlay.

 

Excited to look learn more Beatles songs? Check out JamPlay.com! JamPlay has over 450 guitar courses from 120+ instructors, LIVE daily instruction, and online guitar lessons tailored to every skill level, music genre, and playing style. Click here to learn more.


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Famous Guitar Parts

5 Famous Guitar Parts To Learn This Summer

5 Famous Guitar Parts To Learn This Summer

Famous Guitar Parts

There’s no denying it: Summer 2022 has arrived. School is out, people are embarking on long-awaited vacations, and it’s HOT (well, if you live in the Northern Hemisphere). But what’s even hotter is the ever-growing songbook of summertime anthems. Over the years, musicians and bands have released countless songs that just feel right to crank through your car’s stereo on a summer’s day. And many of the most popular tunes on the list feature recognizable, ear-worm-level lead guitar parts. Today, we’re checking out 5 famous guitar parts you can learn this summer. Let’s dive right in!

1. “Sunshine of Your Love” by Cream

If you are a relatively new guitar player, listen up! Some of your favorite guitarists probably learned this classic, fuzzed guitar riff at some point in their career. “Sunshine of Your Love” is Cream’s second track on their 1967 album, Disraeli Gears, and is still played on radio stations worldwide. The iconic, Jimi-Hendrix-inspired lead guitar part that glues this track together features all the pentatonic, chromatic, vibrato’d tones you love about ’60s blues rock.

In this performance video, Chris Buono shows you how the main guitar parts work together. For the breakdown of how to play this iconic riff, check out Chris Buono’s full song lesson on JamPlay.

 

2. “Brown Eyed Girl” by Van Morrison

Also released in 1967, “Brown Eyed Girl” is one of the most radio-played hits in the history of modern music. This calypso-infused classic features an iconic double stop guitar part, feel-good chord progressions, and lyrics about the joys of youth. This summer song is perfect for learning on guitar, especially if your are a beginner to playing.

In this lesson, JamPlay educator, Mike Henecke provides a little bit of the song’s history before teaching you how to play its famous double stop guitar part. For the full breakdown of the song, check out Mike Henecke’s song lesson on JamPlay.

 

3. “Are You Gonna Be My Girl” by Jet

Hailing from the land Down Under, Jet made waves in the summer of 2003 with their debut hit “Are You Gonna Be My Girl.” Although it feels wrong to call a song from 2003 a “classic” summer song, it has broken the top 20 on so many charts worldwide, we feel it has earned this title. One of the most recognizable features of this song is a bendy, distorted electric guitar part that’s perfect for learning this summer.

Here, David Wallimann shows you how to play this blazin’ electric guitar riff. For the For the breakdown of the song, check out David Wallimann’s full “Are You Gonna Be My Girl” song lesson on JamPlay.

 

4.  “Day Tripper” by The Beatles

Here’s another tune that’s famously carried by an iconic guitar riff. “Day Tripper” was the Beatles’ 1965 double A-Side single accompanying “We Can Work It Out.” Though the record was released in December, the summertime vibes of the lead electric guitar part are undeniable. As the 7th greatest selling single of the 1960s, this is one classic you should absolutely learn this summer!

In this performance, JamPlay educator, John Auker demonstrates how the different guitar parts work together in “Day Tripper.” For the For the breakdown of the song, check out John Auker’s full song lesson on JamPlay.

 

5. “It’s Five O’ Clock Somewhere” by Alan Jackson & Jimmy Buffett

This last tune is one you’ve probably heard if you’ve ever seen live music at a bar or beach lounge. This is because “It’s Five O’ Clock Somewhere” references the popular phrase that excuses drinking alcohol at any time of the day. No matter what your time zone you are in, it’s probably happy hour somewhere on the globe. This 2003 hit, naturally, features an emblematic bluesy guitar part that evokes feelings of relaxation in the sun.

In this performance, David Wallimann demonstrates the electric blues guitar parts in “It’s Five O’ Clock Somewhere.” The lead riff features pentatonic runs, string bends, and some sweet sounding double stop descending thirds. For the For the breakdown of the song, check out David Wallimann’s full song lesson on JamPlay.

 

For an ever-growing library of Song Lessons, check out JamPlay.com! JamPlay has over 450 guitar courses from 120+ instructors, LIVE daily instruction, and online guitar lessons tailored to every skill level, music genre, and playing style. Click here to learn more.


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4 Types of Guitars You'll See on Stage

4 Types of Guitars You'll See on Stage

If you’ve ever been to a rock concert, or seen a video of one, you might have noticed something: there are usually a few different guitars on stage. And if you are new to guitar, or aren’t so familiar with guitar playing, you might have wondered, “why?” One of the reasons for this is that each player usually has a different role in the performance. Some guitarists play rhythmic parts. Some guitarists play lead melodies and licks. And often times you’ll find that these different roles require different types of guitars. So today, we’re going to break down 4 of main types of guitars you’ll find on the stage.

Photo by Martin Rajdl on Unsplash

1. Electric Guitars

The electric guitar is probably the most common type of axe you’ll find up on the stage. Electric guitars rely on magnetic pickups that translate string vibrations into electrical energy. This energy then travels via an audio cable to an amplifier and speaker, which produce the guitar’s sounds. Though pickups are generally interchangeable, some guitar models are known and designed for certain types of playing. For example, the guitar in this photo is a Fender Stratocaster, which is popularly associated with lead guitar legends like Eric Clapton and David Gilmour. Other types of “lead” electric guitars you’ll see, especially at metal or math rock shows, are 7 or 8-string guitars. Schecter and Ernie Ball are two manufacturers known for their selections of these types of guitars!

 

Other electric guitars have pickups and builds that are better suited for strumming and rhythm playing. The Rickenbacker 325, for example, was a favorite of one of the most famous rhythm guitar players in history, John Lennon. Another feature of some rhythm-oriented electric guitars is a hollow or semi-hollow body. Gibson’s notorious ES-335 model is a prime example of a semi-hollow body electric guitar.

 

Photo by Brent Ninaber on Unsplash

2. Acoustic Guitars

If you’re at a rock show, you may only see an acoustic guitar once or twice (if at all) during the performance. This type of guitar utilizes the resonance of a hollow wooden body to amplify the sound of its strings. And thus, acoustic guitars are more popularly used to accompany solo singers or small acoustic bands. They are also used to add a lighter rhythmic textures to full band performances.

 

Of the types of guitars we’re covering here, the acoustic guitar is probably the one you have seen at your friend’s house, being played on a street corner, or being strummed at a campfire. One of the main reasons for their universal popularity is that they are very portable and require no other equipment to deliver a performance. You can find a HUGE selection of affordable acoustic guitars on Sweetwater!

 

By Carstor – Taken by Carstor, CC BY 3.0

3. 12-String Guitars

A 12-string guitar might be tough to spot from the crowd if you don’t know what to look for. Appearing almost identical other electric or acoustic axes, the 12-string is one of the types of guitars that is mainly used for supporting the rhythm and underlying harmony of a song. If you’ve never seen one before, 12-string guitars feature six pairs of strings, eight of which are typically in standard tuning. The first two pairs are tuned in unison to E and B respectively. Then the next four pairs are tuned in octaves to G, D, A, and E. So, when it comes to learning how to play a 12-string, it’s not much different than learning on a standard 6-string!

 

In this photo, 1970s no wave rocker, Arto Lindsay wields a Danelectro Hawk 12-string guitar. Notice the machine heads on the headstock – there are 6 on each side! Thought these particular vintage models are hard to come by, you can find similar ones on Sweetwater!

 

Photo by Gama. Films on Unsplash

4. Bass Guitars

Speaking of the rhythm section, you have probably never been to a concert where a there wasn’t a bass guitar. Unlike other types of guitars, bass guitars are not typically used to play chords or solos. Instead, a bassist’s typical duties include providing a harmonic foundation, “locking in” rhythmically with the drummer, and emphasizing the groove of the song. These duties are underpinned by the thick strings on a bass, which help produce sub frequencies that are essential to the overall feeling of any tune.

 

Some famous bass players you might recognize are Sting (The Police), Flea (The Red Hot Chili Peppers), and Sir Paul McCartney. Feeling inspired to grab a bass of your own? You can find a massive selection of them over at Sweetwater!

 

 

 

 

 

Excited to look at some new gear? Find all kinds of great guitar gear deals over at Sweetwater.com.

For guitar lessons that teach you how to use effects like these, check out JamPlay.com! JamPlay has over 450 guitar courses from 120+ instructors, LIVE daily instruction, and online guitar lessons tailored to every skill level, music genre, and playing style. Click here to learn more.


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6 Famous Guitar Pedals You Should Know

6 Famous Guitar Pedals You Should Know

When the electric guitars first hit the scene in the late 1930s, a new world of possibilities opened up. Effectively, a novel instrument was born. And just like you could mute a trumpet, or prepare a piano, the sounds coming from an electric guitar could be manipulated too. This is where (you guessed it) electric guitar pedals made names for themselves.

The concept of compact guitar effects pedals surfaced as early as the late 1940s. However, the tools themselves didn’t become commercially viable until the 1960s. And since then, countless guitar pedals have come to market and found popularity – some of them making more ‘noise’ than others (pun intended). So, here are 6 famous guitar pedals you should know about!

Red Rooster (talk · contribs), Copyrighted free use, via Wikimedia Commons

1. Maestro FZ-1 Fuzz-Tone Guitar Pedal

Technically, the DeArmond Trem Trol 800 is considered to be the first guitar pedal ever created. But, Gibson was the first to make a stomp box that was suitable for commercial distribution! The Maestro FZ1 Fuzz-Tone became quite popular after was used to record The Rolling Stones‘ 1965 superhit, “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction.” Though this model was discontinued in the 90s, its distant successor was released in 2022. You can find the Fuzz-Tone FZ-M for under $150 on Sweetwater!

 

2. Vox V846 Wah Guitar Pedal

If you have ever listened to psychedelic rock or funk music, chances are you’ve heard the distinctive sounds of the ‘wah’ effect. The actual ‘wah’ sound happens when a moveable EQ band pass filter with a resonant peak moves up and down the frequency spectrum. The position of the peak is controlled by a ‘wah’ pedal’s seesaw foot switch. In the 1960s, VOX became a frontrunner in the ‘wah’ guitar pedal market with its unrivaled V846 model. This pedal achieved notoriety after guitar aficionados discovered it was Jimi Hendrix‘s preference during his 1969 Woodstock appearance. Though vintage V846 models are limited, VOX continues to produce a successor model, the V846-HW. You can find this pedal for under $250 on Sweetwater!

 

By Shin-ei Uni-Vibe (1968), Jimi Hendrix, EMP Museum.jpg:derivative work: Clusternote (talk) – This file was derived from: Shin-ei Uni-Vibe (1968), Jimi Hendrix, EMP Museum.jpg:, CC BY-SA 3.0

3. Uni-Vibe Phase Guitar Pedal

Some say it’s a chorus pedal, and some day it’s a vibrato pedal. Although it emulates both of these effects, the legendary Uni-Vibe was actually a versatile phaser (phase-shifting) pedal. Many speculate the effects this pedal produces were inspired by the oscillatory textures of a Leslie speaker. Pairing well with other effects like fuzz and reverb, the Uni-Vibe was a popular tool amongst 60s and 70s musicians, including Jimi Hendrix and Pink Floyd. Today, many pedal manufacturers offer their own spins on the classic Uni-Vibe sound. You can find one by MXR for under $130 on Sweetwater!

 

4. Memory Man Delay Guitar Pedal

The original methods for achieving delay or echo effects involved using analog hardware. Magnetic tape machines were used to create real-time copies of an original input signal that was played back at a predetermined rate. The problem guitarists found was that this hardware was typically too bulky to be used reliably on stage. A compact console that could produce this effect became a reality with the use of solid-state technology. This is where the pedal manufacturer, Electro-Harmonix made a name for itself. The Deluxe Memory Man pedal became an essential tool for famous guitarists such as The Edge, Chris Cornell, and Jamie Cook. Since the pedal’s release in the 1970s, Electro-Harmonix has reissued several different versions of the pedal. This includes a few you can find on Sweetwater!

 

Kuriosatempel, CC BY-SA 4.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

5. Boss RV-2 Reverb Guitar Pedal

Reverb is an effect you can experience in every day life. The cavernous sounds of a church, or the reflections you hear when singing in the shower are both examples of reverberation. In the audio world, this effect was originally recreated in a few different ways: metal springs and plates were often used to emulate the sound of a confined space. Digital reverb technology simplified all of this when it revolutionized the market in the 1970s. Then, in 1987, Boss revealed its compact RV-2 model that captured the textures of many legacy styles of reverb. This pedal quickly became popular with guitarists and has since become a benchmark for other guitar pedal manufacturers. You can find Boss’ latest iteration of this pedal, the RV-6 for under $180 on Sweetwater!

 

Roadside Guitars, CC BY-SA 2.0 <https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0>, via Wikimedia Commons

6. MXR Dyna Comp Guitar Pedal

Though technically not the first of its kind, the MXR Dyna Comp became one of the earliest, and most popular, compression stomp boxes after its 1972 debut. Compression was originally a tool that telephone manufacturers and record producers used to control the dynamic range audio.  But guitarists eventually fell in love with the sonic qualities and ‘color’ that some compressors brought out of their amplifiers. The MXR Dyna Comp is one guitar pedal that has persisted throughout the years. You can find one for under $100 at Sweetwater!

 

 

 

Excited to look at some new gear? Find all kinds of great gear deals over at Sweetwater.com.

For guitar lessons that teach you how to use effects like these, check out JamPlay.com! JamPlay has over 450 guitar courses from 120+ instructors, LIVE daily instruction, and online guitar lessons tailored to every skill level, music genre, and playing style. Click here to learn more.


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4 Best Electric Blues Guitar Players Ever

4 Best Electric Blues Guitar Players Ever

Blues guitar may seem, to some, like a style that was only popular in a past era. But the reality is that whether you are listening to rock, jazz, pop, country, or any modern genre, chances are that its roots lie in the blues – which had some of its early beginnings with blues guitar players!

Blues music originated as spirituals and work songs sung by African slaves in America, but the earliest indication of blues being played on the guitar didn’t come until about 1903. Then, it wasn’t until the late 1930s when blues guitarists started turning to the newly-invented electric guitar. And since then, some of the greatest players have left their legacy in the blues songbook and inspired the players you know and love today. Here are 4 of the best electric blues guitar players ever!

 

By Pickwick – Billboard, page 59, 25 November 1972, Public Domain

 

1. Chuck Berry

Dubbed, “The Father of Rock ‘n Roll,” no blues guitarist list is complete without this electric guitar pioneer. Not only was Chuck Berry a masterful guitar player with a style that’s emulated today, he was also known for incredible on-stage showmanship.

 

 

 

 

 

Chuck Berry Guitar Lesson with Jeffery Marshall

Get the tab & notation for this Chuck Berry guitar lesson.

In this Chuck Berry guitar lesson, Jeffery Marshall shows you some of Chuck’s most famous guitar licks and tricks. He was known for holding down the rhythm section with 5ths (with added 6ths) through the blues form, and his rhythmic double stop lead guitar lines.

By Lioneldecoster – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0

2. Albert King

Albert King, one of the “Kings of Blues,” had a dramatic style of playing that has inspired countless other blues guitarists since the 1950s. Albert was able to achieve large, multi-step string bends due to the fact that he was a left-handed guitarist that played an upside-down, right-handed guitar, and was able to pull strings with better leverage. This is often the most emulated hallmark of Albert’s playing style.

 

 

 

 

Albert King Guitar Lesson with Jeffery Marshall

Get the tab & notation for this Albert King guitar lesson.

In this lesson, Jeffery Marshall shows you how to approach playing lead guitar like Albert King. Get ready for some big string bends and fierce vibrato!

By Reprise Records – eBayfrontback, Public Domain

 

3. Jimi Hendrix

Jimi Hendrix, inspired by the blues greats, himself, is regarded as one of the most prolific instrumentalists in guitar history. A champion of the fuzz and ‘wah’ effects pedal, Jimi pioneered psychedelic rock and was an electric blues savant. Similarly to Albert King, Jimi Hendrix was also a left-handed guitar player who wielded an upside-down, right-handed guitar. The difference, however, was that Jimi restrung his guitar in ascending order as thought it were a standard left-handed six string.

 

Jimi Hendrix Guitar Lesson with Jeffery Marshall

Get the tab & notation for this Jimi Hendrix guitar lesson.

In this lesson, Jeffery Marshall shows you how Jimi played licks and riffs. This playing style includes using your thumb to reach for notes on the 6th string – don’t worry, we won’t tell your local guitar instructor!

4. Stevie Ray Vaughan

By Bbadventure – Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0

Know for his aggressive right hand strumming technique, Stevie Ray Vaughan brought the blues genre well into the limelight during 1980s. Stevie performed on David Bowie’s Let’s Dance album, released four studio albums, and made many television appearances during his short, 7-year career.

Stevie Ray Vaughan Guitar Lesson with Jeffery Marshall

Get the tab & notation for this Stevie Ray Vaughan guitar lesson.

In this lesson, Jeffery Marshall dives into some of Stevie Ray Vaughan’s unique playing techniques. Get ready to strum the strings like really mean it!

 

Digging these free guitar lessons? Check out Jeffery Marshall’s full JamPlay guitar course, Legends of Blues Rock: Learn Their Tricks.


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